Ahmet MADEN, MD Professor of Ophthalmology, Eye Surgeon

Professor Maden, after his residency, has mainly worked in Dokuz Eylul University Hospital Eye Clinic as Professor of Ophthalmology until recently . For a while, (from 2001 to 2011) he has leaded the Eye Clinic (Head of Department) of Atatürk Educational and Research Hospital, in the same city, Izmir.

During his all academic life, he has trained hundreds of Eye Doctors and performed thousands of divers eye surgeries, advanced treatment modalities with many 'first's published in academic papers. He is the author of a textbook called "Oculoplastic Surgery".

He has been trained in Paris VII. University and obtained an equivalent certificate of eye speciality for France. He, also, has been in United States (LSU Eye Clinic, LA) for observing advances in corneal surgeries, transplantation and eye banking.

Recently, he has ended up his academic life in İzmir and moved to Antalya Memorial. Shortly after, he moved to Dünya Göz Eye Hospitals Group which is, no doubt, more professional institution in the field of ophthalmology.

Actually, He is practising his profession, in a predetermined schedule, both in Baku (Azerbaijan) and Antalya Eye Hospitals.

Professor Maden speaks English and French fluently.

Interests

Eye Info Portal

Blepharitis

Blepharitis

Blepharitis is inflammation of the eyelids. It usually involves the eyelid margins where the eyelashes grow and affects both eyelids. It's a common cause of sore, red eyelids and crusty eyelashes. 
The openings (orifices) of oil glands located near the eyelashes become occluded. The pursuing changes lead to irritated and red eyes. Blepharitis is usually associated with an overgrowth of bacteria along the eyelid margins forming a structure called “biofilm”. And, parasitic eyelash mites called “Demodex” feed on this film. Consequently, the overgrowth of these mites on “biofilm” causes a worsening of the eyelid inflammation. 

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Watery Eyes in Babies / Congenital Lacrymal Duct Obstructions

Watery Eyes in Babies / Congenital Lacrymal Duct Obstructions

Congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction occurs when the lacrimal duct has failed to open at birth, most often due to an imperforate membrane (Hasner Valve) at the inferior end of nasolacrimal duct. 
These babies present a persistent watery eye even when not crying. A sticky and mucupurulant discharge may be present if a secondary infection occurs. 
Most cases resolve in few months after birth, by opening of the obstructing membrane spontaneously.

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Watery Eyes / Lacrymal Duct Obstructions

Watery Eyes / Lacrymal Duct Obstructions

The obstruction of the lacrimal drainage system present with tearing (epiphora, watering of eye), a complaint frustrating to patients needing always a wiper on hand. 
Nasolacrymal duct (NLD) obstruction  is the most common clinical entity of lacrymal drainage system causing outflow of tears, epiphora (watery eye). Chronic dacryocystitis is an infection or inflammation of the nasolacrimal sac, usually caused by blockage of the nasolacrimal duct (NLD). 
Diagnosing dacryocystitis is relatively easy with a history of chronic epiphora and sticky discharge dating back several months or years. The definitive diagnosis is usually done by saline injection (lavage) through the canaliculi. The saline will not pass into the nose and come back (together with mucopurulent secretion collected in sac) through the canaliculi.
The definitive treatment of dacryocystitis is surgical. A wide variety of  stents (mono or bicanalicular silicone stents, Jones tube ..) and microsurgical techniques may be used during these procedures according to the type and level of the obstruction. 

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